Can’t Sleep? You May be Boosting Your Heart Attack Risk

A new study of more than 50,000 people found that insomniacs have between a 27 and 45 percent greater chance of heart attacks than those who get regular sleep.

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Are Sleeping Pills a Dream-Come-True or Nightmare?

It’s 2 a.m. and you’re staring at the ceiling, begging sleep to come. Again. “Has anyone ever stayed awake forever?” you wonder. And then the advertisements for sleeping pills start dancing through your head. Those people look so well rested! Should you jump out of...
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Trouble Sleeping? Here’s Some Sound Sleep Advice

A shortage of nightly Z’s has been linked to depression and weight gain, and now a new study has found that insomnia may also increase the risk of heart attacks. Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology tracked 52,610 men and women who...
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Natural Support for Stress, Anxiety, and Insomnia

PharmaGABA is a safe and effective tool for increasing physical and mental relaxation—without drowsiness or side effects.

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Melatonin in Autism – Effects on Sleep and Behavior

Introduction: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience problems with getting to sleep as well as sleep maintenance. The consequences of this poor sleep quality may include alterations in daytime behavior, memory, and learning. One of the possible...
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Sleeping Pills Can Be Deadly

When you can’t sleep, the temptation to pop a sleeping pill is strong. But did you know you could be risking your life? There’s a large body of research indicating that sleeping pills may contribute to as many as 500,000 deaths each year in the United States. Most...
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Natural Form of GABA Improves Sleep Quality in Clinical Trial

Introduction With the growing concern regarding the serious side effects of both prescription and over-the-counter sleeping pills, it is important…

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Dreaming of Better Sleep: 7 Natural Cures for Insomnia

When sleep seems an impossible dream, it’s tempting to reach for the pill bottle–and an instant fix. But sleeping drugs are not the answer to…

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Create Lucid Dreams for a Better Life

Introduction: If you ever been asleep and aware that you were dreaming you were likely experiencing what is referred to as a “lucid dream.”…

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Carnitine Improves Daytime Alertness in Narcolepsy

Introduction Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone in response to…

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Sleeping Pills Can Be Deadly

When you can’t sleep, the temptation to pop a sleeping pill is strong. But did you know you could be risking your life? There’s a large body of…

Continue Reading

Melatonin in Autism – Effects on Sleep and Behavior

Melatonin in Autism – Effects on Sleep and Behavior

Introduction: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience problems with getting to sleep as well as sleep maintenance. The…

Continue Reading

Natural Support for Stress, Anxiety, and Insomnia

Everyday stress is a normal part of modern living. Job pressures, family arguments, financial woe, traffic and time management are just a few of the…

Continue Reading

Trouble Sleeping? Here’s Some Sound Sleep Advice

A shortage of nightly Z’s has been linked to depression and weight gain, and now a new study has found that insomnia may also increase the risk of…

Continue Reading

Are Sleeping Pills a Dream-Come-True or Nightmare?

It’s 2 a.m. and you’re staring at the ceiling, begging sleep to come. Again. “Has anyone ever stayed awake forever?” you wonder. And then the…

Continue Reading

Can't Sleep? You May be Boosting Your Heart Attack Risk

Can’t Sleep? You May be Boosting Your Heart Attack Risk

A shortage of nightly Z’s has been linked to depression and weight gain, and now a new study has found that insomnia may also increase the risk of…

Continue Reading

Welcome

On the Dr Oz show

DrOz-Sho569

On the show I discussed the failure of conventional medicine to address the underlying issues in many health conditions offering little more than drugs as biochemical “band aids.”

Weekly Health Tip

Mind Your Ps and Qs

PQQ may be the perfect answer to preventing or reversing age-related mental decline.

kiwiPQQ (short for pyrroloquinoline quinone) is a vitamin-like compound found in plant foods that shows a wide range of benefits for brain function and energy production. Learn more about PQQ with the following Q&A.
What Exactly Does PQQ Do?

PQQ is an extremely potent antioxidant that is able to carry out the role of an antioxidant in the body more than 20,000 times—which is a rare thing. For example, other antioxidants, such as vitamin C, are only able to accomplish this “cycling” process about four times.
Are There Any Food Sources of PQQ?

PQQ has been found in all plant foods analyzed to date. Particularly PPQ-rich foods include parsley, green peppers, kiwi, papaya, and tofu. These foods contain 2–3 mcg of PQQ per 100 grams. Green tea provides about the same amount per 4-oz. serving. While these amounts appear to be sufficient in helping our cells carry out their basic functions, research indicates that boosting PQQ through supplementation can produce some amazing effects.

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Featured Condition

June is National “Cataract Awareness Month”

According to a great deal of scientific research, the leading cause of impaired vision and blindness in the United States is an entirely preventable condition. Cataracts are white, opaque blemishes on the normally transparent lens of the eye. They occur as a result of damage to the protein structure of the lens, similar to the damage that occurs to the protein of eggs when they are boiled or fried. As a result, cataracts can make it difficult to see. Approximately six million people have some degree of vision-impairing cataract and among U.S. Medicare recipients, cataract surgery is the most common major surgical procedure with nearly one million procedures each year.

The lens of the eye is, obviously, a vital component of the visual system owing to its ability to focus light (via changes in shape) while maintaining optical transparency. Unfortunately, this transparency diminishes with age. The majority of the geriatric population displays some degree of cataract formation. Even with normal aging there is a progressive increase in size, weight, and density of the lens, but cataracts are not necessarily an inevitable occurrence with aging.

The basic cause of a cataract occurs when the normal protective mechanisms are unable to prevent free radical damage. The lens, like many other tissues of the body, depends on adequate levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes and adequate levels of antioxidants such as lutein, vitamins E and C and selenium, to aid in prevention of damage by free radicals. When the lens is sufficiently damages normal homeostatic control of cellular functions are lost and the cell dies causing the protein.

Individuals with higher dietary intakes of vitamin C and E, selenium, and carotenes (especially lutein) have a much lower risk for development of cataracts. Several studies have shown that various nutritional supplements—multiple vitamin formulas, vitamins C and E, B vitamins (especially B12 and folic acid), and vitamin A—also offer significant protection against cataracts. Studies conducted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study Research Group (AREDS) and others indicate that a combination of these nutrients will likely produce better results than any single nutrient alone or even limited combinations of 3 or less nutrients both in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.

For more information go to "What are Cataracts?"

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